Bible studies for writers

Bible studies for writers | Job 6

It’s natural for grief to turn to anger or vice versa, but Job phrases it much more beautifully. Oh, this chapter tugs at my heart. I hope you read it like a beatnik sitting on a stage waiting for snaps. It’s a super powerful piece of poetry-like prose. I highlighted verse 10, or the end of it rather, but I’ll share the whole thing here: “At least I can take comfort in this: Despite the pain, I have not denied the words of the Holy One.” If I were to sum up this entire book, it would be in those last two lines right there. Job is miserable. He possibly is the most miserable man to have ever walked the face of the Earth. His friends doubt his devotion to God. He most likely doubts a LOT of things. He is absolutely at the end of his rope, and he loses his &#!+, if you know what I mean. I would have lost it a long time ago, and I think it’s ok to get angry. I think it’s ok to ask questions. In fact, I think it is in times like these that we SHOULD ask questions, but not only that, I think God WANTS us to ask questions. He wants to see our hearts. He wants to see that we care. He wants to see that we look to Him for answers. He wants to see us get angry, so that He KNOWS without a doubt, that we do indeed give a dang. And in all his anger and doubt and shouting and suffering, Job is doing exactly what he is supposed to be doing in God’s eyes.

And let’s not make Eliphaz out to be the total bad guy here. Yes, he said some harsh things, but I think in Job’s heart of hearts, he understood his friend’s doubt. The last section are the words of a desperate man, and they also are the words of a good friend. Eliphaz was honest, and Job was honest right back. Those are actually the kinds of friendships you want in your life, as long as they make you grow, and I’m pretty sure both Job and Eliphaz are going to learn something from this experience.

Writing prompt: desperate

Write a cry for help today.

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