Bible studies for writers

Bible studies for writers | Psalm 36

I think we’ve all heard the expression, “His intentions were good.” It’s a pretty self-explanatory saying, not some weird idiom that only makes sense in one language. And since we all can relate to the phrase, we also can relate to the fact that David is describing the opposite of that in his opening stanzas. In fact, he is describing the kinds of people we generally want to stay completely away from. These are the people who have no conscience when horrible things happen to others, and maybe they even plot to get them and to then relish in their agony. I don’t now many of these people, and I hope you don’t either. In fact, thinking about it, I can’t think of a single person in even my biggest of circles who I’d label as truly evil. There are some people I’d label as bad names, but I think they are nice to other people, so I can’t judge them too hard in the context of our relationship. See what I mean? It’s HARD to condemn regular Joes as being absolute losers because we can see, when we look hard enough, that there is some good in there, and with that grace, we can fall back on the phrase, “He had good intentions.” David, however, points out that there are some super bad guys (and ladies) in the world, or at least he alludes to the fact that there might be. And I believe him. But I also believe that what I see as rude or sinful or mean, God might have a different opinion, and it’s not my place to stick my nose where it doesn’t belong.

Sum it up:

Sinners don’t even know they’re sinning sometimes;
And when they do, they don’t care.
They plot.
They plan.
They waste their time
Because God is watching.
He’s planned ahead.
And He provides the Heavens and more
For those with good intentions.

Writing prompt: good intentions

Write about someone who acts with good intentions but still kind of gets under your skin.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s